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20110706
20110706
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
people but a lot of confusion among those in washington as to what is really happening. and that is a big part of the problem. both sides of the aisle are able to sell their point and sell their position to the american people and i think the membership are saying, okay, if he said it is true it must be true. >> i don't think that is true. these people are pandering and it is not just obama. everyone is a pandering, government spending is taxation. this is the highest government spending as a share of g.d.p. in the history of the united states since world war ii. bill clinton cut government spending as a share of g.d.p. dramatically. bush and obama have increased it dramatically. it's a real problem. now, our tax rate is lower. yes. but tax rates only do the amount of money you collect. not the amount of debt you erupting up which is, really, what taxes are in this system. so, you have to cut government spending in this. it is not a time -- if i went to my boss and i said, my wife and i are way overspending, i want to do a balanced approach, would you pay me more and i will cut become on
issued out without hesitation several contempt of court citations involving jail time or big fines to several people. but he does have the power to set her free. but if she is convicted and sentenced on the full one year for each of the four counts you have four years for that and she has been in jail two years and ten months and she served a year for the six counts and convictions of check fraud she was convicted of last year when spending her girlfriend's money while not reporting kay low's whereabouts, and that would put, if it is the hard-line taken by the judge, who could say you still have two years and three months to serve with good behavior, maybe, two years, maybe 22 ins, so the obligations -- so the openings or two years or she could be freed. 30 people have gathered. people from the public aiming to get the 4:00 issuing of passes to get inside the courtroom for tomorrow morning's 9:00 a.m. sentencing. they will get the seats and clearly it is worth the wait. >> her parents indicated repeatedly throughout the trial she thought she was responsible for the child's death. i
: you saw that? >> yes. and breaking downed a the big hugs afterwards with the prosecution. >> bill: i don't care about the hulgs. >> she thought she was going to be convicted. >> bill: why do you say that? >> because the prosecution had a terrific case. a circumstancial case, yes. no evidence that saw someone killing her baby but enough circumstancial evidence that they should have won the case. and she knew it. >> bill: did you see in her face that she thought she was going down. down. >>> i think with the comments of jose baez, he thought she might go down on one of the charges. this was and the death penalty case to begin with. when you can't look at the jury and tell them with specificity what the exact cause of death was. they had a theory but didn't have sufficient evidence except novel forensics to prove it bill you say they should have entered in lesser charges. >> make it a capital case. they could have made it a life without possibility of parole case, fine. >> bill: and that is what you would have done? >> 12 jurors sitting there. >> they could have been life in prison. >>
that? >> yes. and breaking downed a the big hugs afterwards with the prosecution. >> bill: i don't care about the hulgs. >> she thought she was going to be convicted. >> bill: why do you say that? >> because the prosecution had a terrific case. a circumstancial case, yes. no evidence that saw someone killing her baby but enough circumstancial evidence that they should have won the case. and she knew it. >> bill: did you see in her face that she thought she was t bill you say they should have entered in lesser charges. >> make it a capital case. they could have made it a life without possibility of parole case, fine. >> bill: and that is what you would have done? >> 12 jurors sitting there. >> they could have been life in prison. >> bill: let's continue on guilfoyle's team. do you believe that she is right that that he 14u should e gone and prosecuted on a lesser charge with more of a chance of conviction on the charge? >> they did. they spend ough all of the time trying to convince on the death penalty count. all the time on that count and no time on the aggravated manslaughter count an
: the last 48 hours this investigation has gone from about this big to this big. some officials may have already been caught lying. not only that, now we're told u.s. wasn't just helping send guns to mexico, taxpayers paid for some of those guns. and more than one federal agency knew about it. that's the latest in the scandal we know as fast and furious. according to sources an f.b.i. informant allegedly used taxpayer money to buy guns on behalf of the cartels, the f.b.i. knew it, they allowed it to happen and they failed to tell congress or the agency that was investigating him, causing that agency, the atf to spend two years, thousands of man-hours and millions of dollars pursuing information the f.b.i. already had about a man, the atf would never be allowed to arrest because he worked for the f.b.i. this information was confirmed this week sources say by the acting atf director ken nelson who met secretly on july 4th with congressman darrell issa and senator charles grassley. nelson who is going to be the fall guy in this scandal dropped a few bombs in his deposition indicating others
it has not yet determined the cause of the spill. >>> big role in the 2012 elections the commanders in the forces in afghanistan as he prepares to take on a new challeng@@ >> fox news has learned a member of an al qaeda linked group has flown to new york today as after being interrogated for a few months. he was questioned by military personnel and was said to have provided useful intelligence. he was already charged in court. city council building north of baghdad left at least 356 people dead. the assault began with ka car bomb. it was followed by a roadside blast. a series of attacks as the iraqi government decides whether to keep some troops in iraq past the end of the year withdraw deadline. they postponed to give president obama limited authority against libya. britain's defense secretary says rebel forces to enter any time soon. it is a drawn out intervention there. heavy fighting was reported monday and today near the opposition strong hold. 11 people were killed. at least four of the troops killed. the man in charge of the u.s. war effort is on his way out. dominique has th
october 14, 2008. the big question tonight, will tonight be her last night sleeping there? earlier today, inmates helped set up barricades outside of the jail just in case big crowds show up there tomorrow. if the judge continues his hardline stance exhibited during the trial he could take into account the time already served and give her the full maximum four years for the four counts, the convictions for lying to the cops so she could still have two years left to serve. >> shepard: what about money? could the judge force casey anthony to pay back the tax money they spent on really the lies of three years ago? >> that is absolutely what we expect. judge belvin perry to perhaps apply and force casey anthony to pay that back. the state's attorney office confirming they are figuring out the financial figures to present to the judge. and tim mil miller from texas equisearch also expressed filing a civil suit against casey anthony because they spent $100,000 in the fall, bypassing doing other searches for other really missing children to focus in orlando on finding caylee. >> shepard: we saw
. the big question, though, is for the prosecution team, what did they do potentially wrong here, because they were certainly very confident in their case. here is lamar lawson. >> we're disappointed with the verdict today and surprised, because we know the facts, and we put in absolutely every piece of evidence that existed. our attorney did an exemplary job. i'm proud of them and i stand by their work. i never, ever criticize a jury. theirs is the task of deciding what to believe. >> reporter: the prosecutor also said that what really hampered the case was the frequent that -- fact that the decomposition, the six months it took to find caylee's remains, really hampered the prosecution because they lost so much crime scene evidence, fingerprints, perhaps they may have found on the duct tape and the laundry bag, phil. -- bill. bill: fel keating, thank you. alisyn has more. alisyn: we need to talk more about these jurors. they left immediately after the reading. remember this was after six weeks of being sequestered and finish of -- none of them wanted to talk about their momentous decisio
to explain why she was exonerated. listen to this. >> the big question was the prosecution did not answer is how caylee died and that was a big factor and i think in a lot of our decisions and it also showed that something with george anthony, casey's father, he was definitely hiding something for all the different times that he was, you know, on the stand. something that happened, he knew about it. and so we did really think she possibly -- we didn't know how she died. but it just comes down to it was probably an accident but the family did not know how to cope with it so instead tried to hide it. >> that was the thing, you know, the prosecution could not say how that baby died. and you got to wonder if moving forward in these kind of high profile cases, you have to have every stinking piece of evidence ever imaginable. do you -- what did we do before we had d.n.a.? did they ever prove any murder convictions? i don't know. >> process cushion said she was suffocated, 300 pieces of evidence but we have no conviction. joining us right now, andrea lyon, former co-leading defense attorney for
cuts. in a big deal, lawmakers may find them worthwhile. state republican leader mitch mcconnell says they all want a deal but they fear a big tax increase. >> bret: the director of the capital of economic advisors will join us in a moment. federal appeals court barred any enforcement on the ban on openly gay service members. the ninth circuit court of appeals in san francisco says the "don't ask, don't tell" policy must be lifted immediately. they repealed it in september but the pentagon is working on the transition. we learned today that the shooter in the fort hood massacre will face death penalty in his court-martial. army sigh control psychiatrist nidal hasan faces charges in the shooting spree at the texas army post. authorities are warning airlines that terrorists may try to con seem explosives within their bodies. we have more on the story we told you about tuesday, about a terror suspect being brought to the u.s. to face criminal charges. national correspondent catherine herridge has defails. >> reporter: this court in southern district of new york is where somali national t
in the courtroom and not watching the evidence the way the jurors did. i think that's the big problem here. everyone can sit on the sidelines and have opinion opinion about it and everybody's outraged that a baby is dead. of course, everybody is devastated that this young child is gone. but it's the state's burden to prove beyond a reasonable doubt how and who killed that baby. >> but judith -- remi, so sorry. but, remi, couldn't i say that people who aren't in the courtroom know more? >> no. >> because they have access to all the tv shows. >> no, no, no, no. you would think so. the problem is, all of us are talking about things that isn't getting before the jury. the rules of evidence exist to make sure that only the relevant and appropriate evidence get to the jury. there is no different from any other case getting tried. the defense attorney's getting beaten up by the judge, by the prosecutor. the defense attorney's being called out for the mistakes he or she may be making. but the jury doesn't see that. >> that's not fair. it's not fair! they should be seeing everything. judith, when y
, the big question is whether or not his defense attorneys will actually ask for this case and the charges to be dropped, and what the judge will say about that, or, if there's some other reason for them to meet. you know what, what we're learning is there are details that have come out about the accuser in this case, and her past, that even had the prosecution now asking questions about this woman. questions that this trial could hinge on, because she is their witness. the only way that they can really press sexual assault charges against dominic strauss-kahn is with her testimony, convincingly, so it has been said, by prosecutors up until now. will defense attorneys for dominic strauss-kahn then ask this judge to dismiss the charges based on the fact that the prosecution may or may not have enough evidence to go forward. we're watching this, that meeting is coming up, those manhattan prosecutors and defense lawyers, meeting in an office. as soon as we know what -- what has happened, we'll bring it to tower office. this is big news, this man lost his job behind the sexual assault charges
the world began. >> glenn: professor, tell me how the world began. >> the big bang theory, of course. >> glenn: no. now know what that is? there is a burning match. where did the match come from? who struck the cover? it's called first cause. don't call it god. professor, tell me what first cause is. "the big bang." no, sir. that is a reaction to something. tell me first cause. and who caused it? what caused it? >> i completely agree. the funny thing was the two of us were talking after class and i forget which one of us it was, but we posed the question why didn't either up with of us say anything? the only answer that could come to either one of our heads was i don't want to get a bad grade, or he has to write me a recommendation letter. >> glenn: believe me, believe me. don't be bullied by these people. they are counting op it. they are counting op it. you are examples. have you looked -- i want you to go online and i want you the look at the picture of the marchs with martin luther king. i want you to look at them. i have. over and over and over again. i have looked at them. they
, they are running far away. >> they've been bitten. >> tragedy is that little girl with those big eyes are haunting. >> sean: what a cute kid. >> o my god. sean, real fast this is america man. i'm so proud to be here. where a jury weighed something. i respect that jury. i'm on jeanine's side all the time but i respect that jury. >> sean: i do too. they had me from the get-go because of her behavior. just give me something. >> bad prosecution. >> sean: are we doing a greta check? >> greta: yes. we have a guest tonight you may want to stick around and watch. it is one of the alternate jurors who sat through the entire trial. >> sean: is this number 14? >> greta: number 14. >> sean: i heard him today on the fox news channel, it was great. >> greta: what people don't realize is the jury sees a different trial than the rest of us do watching on tv or the courtroom. they are the ones who are deciders. they see a very different trial than even the people sitting in the courtroom. i'm looking forward to interviewing him. >> sean: greta in 17 short minutes. more with our legal analysis. >> please, i ask thi
. if the prosecutor did it would look like sour grapes. they lost the big case they ought to think twice. >> greta: while tell you why i would not. the fact that cindy said that car smelled like death showed this was not a mother trying to protect her child, because she wouldn't have said that and repeated it and tried to soften it. i think cindy was mistaken, i don't think she was lying. >> she was all over the place. honestly, this was not the piece of evidence that lost the case. why take more from this woman? her life is bad enough. i don't think they are going to do it and i don't think they should. >> greta: bernie, sentencing is thursday, what would you give casey anthony and why? >> everything you can give her. she lied in a homicide investigation. it didn't get any more important. it was her daughter. she should have stood up and said this is what happened. whatever this was. and admitted to the police. throw the book at her, give her everyday you can. >> greta: and you are a defense lawyer. >> absolutely. i'm not her defense lawyer, but i'm a defense lawyer. >> greta: ted? >> i would thr
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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